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Sci-Fi Fantasy FREAK

Sci-Fi Fantasy FREAK. Yeah!

How would you like a subscription service that caters specifically to the sic-fi and fantasy genres? I know I would. And when founder Matthew Keith emailed me with the news I whooped a gleeful “YES!” and got up to do a Snoopy Dance. (No, there are no recordings. Too bad, right?)

The really cool thing is that I’d just been doing some serious wishful thinking for that very thing. I mean, I enjoy getting announcements the other subscription services, but even though some of them allow you to set a preferred genre, that’s not always what appears in the ol’ mailbox.

Not that I’m discriminating! I enjoy picking up books from other genres to read, too, but I have loved the speculative genre—and fantasy in particular—since I was knee high to a grasshopper. In fact, the first story I ever wrote was about a magic bunny. I think I was about five. It was before I could successfully produce penmanship legible to anyone but myself, but luckily I had a scribe: my big sister, who further encouraged my imagination with wonderful things like itty-bitty yarn dollies (whose necessarily upright hair styles naturally led to fantasy), stories she made up, Tolkien, and her fantastic artistic skills.

But wait, I digress. Here’s what the site is all about:

With so many options available online to book buyers, it makes it hard to find what you’re looking for. Especially if, like us, you only read SciFi and Fantasy. This site has been created to simplify your search. No more wading through “everything else” in order to find the books you want. At SciFiFantasyFREAK, we will never advertise anything that doesn’t fall within those two genres.

SciFi Fantasy FREAK can be found here:
EDIT: Much to my disappointment, SciFiFantasyFREAK had a short life. The service now lists books of all genres and can be found at Betty Book FREAK. 🙁
What do you think? Do you have any other go-to places for your sci-fi fantasy fix?

 

Win a Copy of Scrivener

Here’s a deal I had to share with all the writers reading my blog…

Out:Think Group is giving away a copy of Scrivener to five lucky winners. Scrivener, in case you haven’t heard of it, is the bomb-dot-com when it comes to writing. Novels, technical works, short stories, memoirs, blogging—you name it, Scrivener can handle it. Beautifully.

Written by writers for writers, available for Mac, Windows, and Linux, I’ve waxed poetic about it before here, and a little bit (down toward the bottom of the post) here. The more I use Scrivener, the more I like love it. It organizes, helps outlining and/or storyboarding (or not!), formats manuscripts for things like e-book publishing or print books, helps you keep track of things with labels and tags, has a search feature too fantastic for one sentence, and cartwheel-inducing revision abilities. It slices! it dices!

Okay, not really, but it certainly makes slicing and dicing—er, editing—easier. I mean, how brilliant is dragging-and-dropping entire scenes? Can your fancy-schmancy text editor do that? And can it keep copies of web pages for research? Pictures? Video?

Yeah, baby, that’s what I’m talkin’ about.

Don’t believe me? Check it out right here: Scrivener at Literature and Latte.

And then dash over to Out:Think to jump in on the Scrivener Giveaway. The contest ends July 30, 07:00PM AMT, and prizes will be awarded August 04, 07:00PM AMT.

Literature and Latte also have an excellent collection of video tutorials in addition to a walk-through included with the application and an extensive forum that includes help for Scrivener and other Lit-and-Lat applications.

If that’s not enough for you, please be sure to visit these websites:

And don’t forget to check out Tim Grahl’s marvelous Out:Think website too! Tim Grahl has helped thousands of writers build a successful writing career. “Are you ready to thrive as an author?”

Follow Me to AR Silverberry’s Digs!

Author AR Silverberry is interviewing me over on his blog as part of a series to introduce the authors of the Fantasy Sci-Fi Network. Here’s an excerpt:

How do you approach crafting a novel? 

I sneak up on it and tackle it when it’s not looking! 

Actually, each of my novels has started with an idea—a scene, a character, a “what if.” I jot it down, let it burble around in the caverns of my imagination for a while, then add a little more. I tend to gravitate toward characters more than anything as a starting point, and fleshing them out is a great way for me to develop the setting and the plot.

Keep reading! 


I’m a Semi-Finalist!

As the Crow Flies is a semi-finalist in the Kindle Book Review’s 2014 Kindle Book Awards,  Sci-Fi / Fantasy category!

How exciting! The Top-5 Finalists in each category will be announced in September 2014. Good thing I’m not in the habit of chewing my nails…
If you haven’t got one yet, be sure to pick up a copy of As the Crow Flies at any of these retailers:  Amazon, SmashwordsBarnes & NobleKobo or iTunes

Good, Clean Reading

This might come as a shock to you, but I love fantasy books (and movies!).

There was a time when I could pick any fantasy book off the shelf and not have to worry about over-the-top violence and gore, sex, and foul language. I miss those days…

All is not lost, though!

The Fantasy & Science-Fiction Network  (FSF Net) is dedicated to helping fans find the very best fantasy & sci-fi books for children and adults (both young and old) which do not exceed a PG-13 rating.

On the website you will find author profiles, reviews, interviews, and various articles of interest to the fantasy or science-fiction connoisseur. The group also has a presence on Facebook, Twitter, and (new!) Goodreads.

Be sure to go visit, like, follow, share, and participate!

I will be sharing more groups and sites like this in the future—stay tuned!

You can also pay a visit to my own list of Flinch-Free reading recommendations: Read these!

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Have you got a go-to site for finding clean fantasy and sci-fi reads?
 
What are some of your favorite (clean) fantasy and sic-fi books?

The Series That Snuck Up On Me, Guest Post by William Hahn

Ladies and Jellybeans, Wonderful Readers, much to my delight we have author William Hahn joining us to talk about how he tackles (tackled?) writing a series. William taught Ancient-Medieval History for years, which wonderfully supports his journey into the realm of fantasy. He has written, in fact, an entire compendium about the lands in his novels—which is amazing bonus material for his readers and inspirational for those of us who write. Be sure you read through to the end of the post for a chance to enter a giveaway!

Take it away, Will!

I’m very pleased to be invited to address Robin’s readers, and the topic could not be hotter. On the one hand, I’m a huge proponent of working tales into series for several reasons:

First and foremost, because—as indie authors and particularly using e-pub—we can shake off the chains of artificial constraints on length and form, which are often just echoes of the paper-pub model that does not serve us.
Also there seems no question that today’s mobile and tech-savvy readers like shorter forms. It’s not that their appetite for reading overall has gone down. But “bite-sized” reading is more enjoyable for them because reading time has also been chopped up. It’s more often the twenty minutes’ commute to work, and rarely two hours curled up by the fire with cocoa anymore. And a short e-book is all set to become a right-sized audiobook!
Shorter formats turn pricing pressure on e-books into an advantage. You can justify a lower price for your work, and the reader doesn’t need to risk as much to take a flier on you, especially at first. Win-win.

Having said all that… I’m probably the worst example of a series writer you’ll ever meet!
Part One: The Accidental Series
I write epic fantasy tales; guys like me look at a 40,000 word novella and say “nice first chapter; where’s the rest?” Once I decided to put my hand to describing The Lands of Hope, I cranked out an 85,000 word… thing, that I immediately recognized was not a full story. Not even one! It was instead the latter two-thirds of a full length novel, of which I had not envisioned the right starting place. Later on, I would finally locate that spot, and now The Plane of Dreams is a proper novel, tending towards long by other genre standards, but nothing special within epic fantasy at 114,000 words. In the process I realized it is in fact the middle book of a series; there’s a full-length novel behind it (name TBD) and another coming after it (entitled “The Test of Fire”). But that’s old school, LoTR thinking about a classic paperback trilogy—today, series are supposed to be SHORT! Patience.
Meantime, I had turned to another subject and out sprang Judgement’s Tale, my upcoming release. I wrote and polished it for about a year, and wound up with a 200,000 word “monsterpiece.” I know, “get to the series already.” Well, this is it! I polished and re-read the work, and wondered what to do with it. First I ran it out there on query to twoscore agents—gee, unknown author in the ice-cold epic fantasy genre with a bulging first manuscript, I still can’t understand why they passed. But I was still thinking “paper” and “representation” and “advance” and all kinds of other things I should have known from the start were the REAL fantasy! My mind moves slowly.
Part Two: A Series on Purpose
After a month of drowning my sorrows (which turns out is incredibly hard to do when you don’t drink alcohol), I discovered the indie/e-pub path and have been very happy since. But I knew the long form wasn’t going to fly well there either: something in me said to hold back. I turned to an idea I had for shorter tales, novellas in a real no-kidding series. The Ring and the Flag and Fencing Reputation, first two of four tales in the series Shards of Light, are on the web now. Each focuses on a different hero in the set of three who are at the center of the plot; I designed the first two tales so you can start with either one, they stand alone and come in at nice novella length (33 and 45 thousand words). The third tale, Perilous Embraces, is half-done at 35 thousand words and unquestionably the hardest thing I’ve ever tried to write. I want to keep momentum, try to build that slow burn as so many bloggers advise. Shards of Light is going to be a terrific tale but this third installment (well, honestly the heroine) is giving me a tough time right now. So, what to do…
Part Three: When I Wasn’t Looking
That’s when it hit me. Well actually, that’s when a good friend hit me, right on the forehead like those V-8 commercials. And virtually, with a pleasant email invitation but still—pow! Take Judgement’s Tale, the epic monsterpiece that no agent or publisher in their right mind—barring one—would touch, and break it up into a series! Oh sure, you guessed it all along, right. I was skeptical but intrigued, and looked over my manuscript. And sure enough, the chapter breaks I already had in the tale worked out really well—first installment a little shorter as you would want, the others getting a bit longer as the tale develops.
I worked out a release schedule with my publisher—oh hold on, tiny detail—
I HAVE A PUBLISHER!!
I signed a contract and everything. Two or three times a week I take it out, read it, see my signature at the bottom and just giggle like a schoolgirl.
So—contract terms, release schedule, cover art, editing service, and right now this very blog tour you’re reading. All part of the plan, thanks to the flexibility brought about by e-books, self-publishing and a jot of ingenuity. Truly, it is a marvelous time to be an author. The freedom to publish when I choose, in the length and form I want, has been more joy to me than I can describe. My most ambitious work is coming to the world starting July 4th, and by creating a series I make it hopefully easier for readers to take in, and gain a little time to continue working on my other material knowing my “slow burn” is set for the future.
Think seriously about series! The advantages of publishing your work in installments go far beyond the list I started out with. I’d be interested to hear your thoughts, thumbs-up or down, when it works or not. I hope you will look into my upcoming series, beginning with Judgement’s Tale Part One, Games of Chance. Who knows, it could be the start of something for both of us.

Games of Chance

For twenty centuries the Lands of Hope prospered from their Heroes’ peace, but suffer now from their absence as a curse thickens over the central kingdom known as the Percentalion. An immortal omniscient conspirator schemes to escape the extra-worldly prison restraining his tide of undeath, using a demonic ally in a plot to bring back hell on earth. Solemn Judgement steps onto these Lands both a stranger and an orphan, driven to complete the lore his father died to give him.

In a world beset with increasing chaos, the bravest Children of Hope must take mortal risks. A young woodsman’s spear-cast, a desperate bid to save his comrades; the Healers Guildmistress’ cheery smile, hiding a grim secret and a heavy burden of guilt; the prince of Shilar’s speech in a foreign tongue, a gambit to avoid bloodshed or even war. As a new generation of heroes, scattered across the kingdoms, bets their lives and more, Solemn Judgement- soon to be known as The Man in Grey- must learn to play… Games of Chance: Part One of Judgement’s Tale.

Author William L. Hahn

Will Hahn has been in love with heroic tales since age four, when his father read him the Lays of Ancient Rome and the Tales of King Arthur. He taught Ancient-Medieval History for years, but the line between this world and others has always been thin; the far reaches of fantasy, like the distant past, still bring him face to face with people like us, who have choices to make.

Will didn’t always make the right choices when he was young. Any stick or vaguely-sticklike object became a sword in his hands, to the great dismay of his five sisters. Everyone survived, in part by virtue of a rule forbidding him from handling umbrellas, ski poles, curtain rods and more.

Will has written about the Lands of Hope since his college days (which by now are also part of ancient history). With the publication of Judgement’s Tale Part One, Games of Chance, he begins at last to tell the tale of the Land’s most unique hero, The Man in Grey.


Rafflecopter of the Lands Contest

Enter to win free Tales of Hope here!

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Charles David Carpenter & D.W. Jones New Release!

Somehow Posting Day has snuck up on me. I’m not sure where the rest of the week went, though I do recall slaaaaaving away (Just kidding, L.A.) to update the author index and profiles over at the Fantasy Sci-Fi Network, to which I belong. Actually, it was fun reading about the other members of the group and adding their books to my collection the list. The group is growing fast, and I get to work with some fantastic folks. Be sure to check them out!

And speaking of collecting more books to read, you might recall that I interviewed Charles David Carpenter and D.W. Jones back in February. Great guys. No, really.

And guess what? They’ve just released their second book in the Necromancers’ Pride series, entitled Tides of War!! Aaaaawsome!

Can Corwyn and Velladriana complete their quest? Will Crispin and Dolthaia escape the dangerous followers of Maars the Lector? What drove the Viper’s Legionnaire Reese to lands so far from his home? What schemes are the Weavers concocting? What darkness will the Necromancers unleash? What are the true extents of the Pride’s powers? 

You’ll have to get a copy and find out!

Have you read any (other) good fantasy books lately? Share in the comments!

99-cent FSFNet eBook Blast!

I’m participating in a fantastic eBook Sale! It’s a one-day only gig, so saddle up your dragon or strap on your jet packs and get over to the Fantasy Sci-Fi Network to grab your choice(s) from over a dozen fantasy and sci-fi books. All of these titles are priced under $0.99 at the time of writing this post. Prices are subject to change, so check the price before clicking “buy.”

The 99-cent sale is 24 hours only starting May 23, 2014 12:01 AM PST


The FSF Net is a growing group of over fifty authors who have gathered together to create a unique news channel dedicated to fans of fantasy and science-fiction books. Their members include some of today’s top bestselling fantasy and sci-fi authors like J.D. Hallowell, Brian Anderson, Lindsay Buroker, and Leeland Artra. All fantasy and sci-fi works by its member authors are guaranteed to not exceed the PG13 standard as described in the group’s website. While most of the books are written for adult fans of sci-fi and fantasy, the books are safe for all readers 13+ with limited violence, limited swearing, and no erotica. Since its creation in December of 2013, the network has helped launch many more bestselling authors, and its membership continues to grow weekly.

Pass it on! Be sure and share the news on your favorite social media sites!

The Robin Has Landed!

No, the post title is not the title of a new book—though it might make a really fun spoof. I have had hardly any time for even thinking about writing. You see, Hubster just woke up one day and said, “I need something sportier.”

He was talking about a house.

Okay, technically, that’s not what he said, but Maxwell Pig’s line somehow seemed to fit the moment, because his sudden action on a desire he’d been vaguely harboring for a few years was, you know, sudden. Being the cautious one, I implored that we take things slowly. We were talking about a big commitment financially, emotionally, physically… We bought our first house over twenty years ago. It doesn’t seem like that long, but I did the math, and it’s true. We put a lot of work and a lot of love into updating it, and there were still projects and hopes lined up—including the addition of a garage (which one really needs in northern Utah). My youngest daughter grew up there. Having moved around quite a bit when I was young, I dreamed of buying a house and living there forever. Like Hubster’s parents. Like his grandparents. And probably their parents…

We looked at several houses to get a feel for the market. Or at least that’s what I thought we were doing. Then BAM! We were making an offer and putting our first house on the market. All in a matter of days. It wasn’t ready. *I* wasn’t ready. And yet there I was, sorting through our two decades of accumulated stuff, packing and giving away and throwing away. Not only did we not want to bring useless stuff with us, but we were downsizing a little. Bye-bye to my craft room. Bye-bye to the guest room. Bye-bye to Hubster’s never-finished-photo-studio.

I’ll tell you, decluttering on such a scale sure gives one a new perspective about the life they’ve lived and how they might be spending the future!
Faster than I could credit, we were signing the closing papers.
We didn’t get the keys, and that ended up taking a little longer than we’d hoped. We made the 50 minute drive with the Forerunner packed to the gills and me making jokes about trying to keep the front tires on the pavement. Our excitement, which went up and down with each obstacle and “one more thing” we’d encountered, hit an all-time low. We’d first viewed the house through rosy glasses. Hubster was sold on the garage (ANY garage); I was enamored with the large kitchen/dining/family room area, which could actually accommodate our growing family for get-togethers and holidays. The inspection revealed far more grime than we’d previously noticed. Stepping over the threshold with our belongings to put away, we discovered the real truth of the matter: The people who had lived here before hadn’t cleaned anything during the two(ish) years they’d lived here. Nothing. Not. One. Thing.
“Eww,” was the word of the day. The week! I’d have been so embarrassed to leave my house in that condition! It took Hubster and me four hours to clean the top half of the kitchen, including the microwave and the kitchen sink. Then we discovered we’d missed a cabinet. Yikes. Mostly, I just wanted to cry. I’d just spent the last couple weeks packing and cleaning our old house, and now I was going to have to deep clean the new one. I’d expected to have to wipe things down and make it “my” clean, but not to this extent. Thank goodness for my sweet sister in law, who bravely and unselfishly tackled some very nasty bathrooms—and still managed to keep her sense of humor.
A neighbor loaned us his covered trailer so we could start moving the boxes and smaller things while saving most of the furniture for the weekend and the much-needed manly and muscular help. We fit a lot of stuff in that thing, which we hooked up to the little pick-up truck my father-in-law so graciously loaned us. Our only serious mishap was “two” theme: two flat tires, (nearly) two hundred bucks for new ones, and two hours of sitting on the expressway. “Could have been worse,” Hubster said. “Could have been raining.”
Naturally, my imagination supplied MUCH more gruesome and drastic “worse” scenarios. I’m a writer. A key developmental tool is the question, “What’s the worst thing that could happen to your character?” Thankfully, we were not at the mercy of a ruthless author. Our wonderful son and the nifty new cell phone (with Google Maps on it to tell us where the nearest tire seller was located) my #2 daughter helped me get came to our rescue.
On the big day the Moving Crew arrived, along with two big trucks, another (huge!) trailer, several cars, and my darling grandson. He handled the big stuff without even breaking a sweat.
Seriously—a HUGE thank you to everyone who helped, whether it was lifting and carrying, driving, unpacking, making our bed (!), providing pizza (!), posing with the elk antlers, loading up the pantry, or loaning keys and coolers. You all RAWK!
So the bulk of the cleaning and putting the house “together” is done. Hubster may argue; half the garage is still full of boxes, but it’s a work in progress! It took us 20+ years to put it together the first time, it’s going to take a little while to rearrange and polish.
Here is a peek at the NEW family room and my NEW office (please pardon my abysmal photography skills—using PhotoBooth on my laptop, of all things):

Not done yet, but now you know what I’ve been up to since I fell into the rabbit hole. More virtual catching up to do next week. Tomorrow? I’m gonna WRITE.
Graphic Credits:
House for Sale = IconShots
Angel = GraphicHive
Adorable Grandson = his daddy
House pics = mine (where IS that photographer hubby when I need him?)

Is It Possible to Self-Edit Your Book?

Welcome back to the Friday Feature of our Fantasy writers group, A Drift of Quills! We Quills get together once a month to chat up aspects of reading and writing—and this time we discuss the exciting prospect of self-editing. Grab yourself some cookies and a notepad for jotting notes!

 

KRISTIE KIESSLING
Author of the short story, Sanguis Dei and a poetry collection, Light and Dark

Is it possible to self-edit your book?

YES! In fact, even if you hire an editor, you MUST be able to self-edit your book or you will be wasting money. As Kristen Lamb says, there are many editors who charge by the hour. Don’t waste money on edits you can do yourself! If you hire an editor, you want him or her to be looking at the guts and glory, the meat and potatoes of your story not the dinnerware–in other words, don’t have an editor clearing out overused adverbs and fixing repetitive, common errors that YOU can fix.

Site after site on the internet can help you self-edit well. USE them!

Just because you may hire an editor does not mean you won’t be self-editing. Every writer must do some self-editing and if you, like me, can’t afford an editor in the beginning for that first novel, don’t be terrified. It isn’t the end of the world. If you can write a good hook, you can edit that hook.

Here are just three of some of the many rules for the success of your first self-edit:

1–Put space between yourself and your work. Finish a story and give yourself a month to step away from it before you begin editing. Don’t think about it, work on it or play with it.

2–Edit hard copy. Make changes right on the paper, look for continuity, frequently repeated words or common usage errors. It’s all easier to see on paper without the danger of deleting something you might want to keep.

3–Read it out loud. Dialogue that looks good on the screen or on paper can sound campy, stilted or downright ridiculous when read out loud. This tip also helps with long, detailed sections of descriptions. If you get tired of reading it aloud, your readers will get tired of it, too.

It isn’t easy, but it can be done. Stick to it! Check out these websites for more helpful tips on self-editing your novel. You’ll find some great stuff in these pages:

Advice for Self-Editing Your Novel, by Steven J. Carroll
How I Self-Edit My Novels: 15 Steps From First Draft to Publication, by K.M. Weiland
Six Easy Tips for Self-Editing Your Fiction, by Kristen Lamb

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YOURS TRULY
Author of As the Crow Flies and two short stories
My website (You can use this link or you could use the menu at the top. Whatever lights your candle!)

Is it possible to self-edit your book? Yes, but…

It’s really hard to do it on your own! Kristie gives some excellent advice in her part of the panel—worth repeating, so read it again but with my voice in your head.

I recently read a best-selling novel written by an indie author who claimed to have run the manuscript several times through a couple of editors. The experience left me slack-jawed. I do not know if the editors (two of them!) were really that bad, or if the author simply didn’t implement their suggestions. Unfortunately, the former is all too possible. One can find many “editors” online, but that doesn’t mean they can actually do the work. The aforementioned one came with a website and all sorts of credentials, which leaves me wondering. A large portion of the errors could have been fixed “in house” if the author had followed Kristie’s advice, but…

This requires an author actually knowing what adverbs/adjectives are and how to use them, how to properly punctuate and spell, understanding point of view, recognizing the difference between active and passive voice, and so on. There are an astonishing number of authors who don’t, or who believe it doesn’t really matter. It does. Take the time to learn. A writer should always be learning. In addition to trade books, we get to read fiction! Lots of fiction! One of the coolest things about reading is how we start assimilating what we read: we learn how to spell and to punctuate, we pick up the rhythm of words in a tale, we learn how to weave a story.

There are several fantastic online editing aids available to you. Use those, too. Here are a few to get you started:

Grammarly ($)
Writing Dynamo ($)
ProWritingAid
Hemingway
AutoCrit Editing Wizard

Next, you need to form a good beta reader group (not less than three) to test your manuscript. Your readers should be in your target audience, forthright but tactful, not related to you, and regular readers (in your genre) that understand how a book is structured.

And finally, there are some very decent books to help you with self-editing:

Revision & Editing, by James Scott Bell
Self-Editing for Fiction Writers, 2n Edition: How to Edit Yourself Into Print, by Renni Browne and Dave King
The Little Book of Self-Editing for Writers: 12 Ways to Take Your Book from Good to Great, by Bridget McKenna

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PATRICIA REDING
Author of Oathtaker

Is it possible to edit your own work? I think so, though it is difficult. I direct your attention to some terrific resources my fellow Quills shared with you today. They address many potential pitfalls, all of which it is wise to address and consider. The one thing those resources do not address, however, is the possibility of losing your story for the sake of pleasing someone else.

I have conversed over the past few days with an author whose work I’ve read and very much enjoyed. I explained how I am going through another round of edits and have reached the point where I am changing things one way, then changing them back. (At this rate, I will never make it to the end.) I mentioned to him that I had others reading as beta readers. While they had only gone through the first few chapters, they had addressed critical issues. I cannot say enough how much I appreciate their time and effort on my behalf. Some of their ideas I adopted readily. Others, if I were to follow, would cause the entire story to fall apart. The author I mentioned explained to me how precisely that had happened to one of his earlier works. He changed things until the story was no longer his own—and no longer one he enjoyed or would share. It sits on a shelf where it collects dust. “We cannot write by committee,” he told me.

The author of a work is the only one with the big picture—the only one who sees how each meeting, each conversation fits into the whole. While there are all sorts of grammar rules, point of view issues and so forth that need to be addressed, there is also the author’s own voice and unique story to consider.

During my editing process, I picked up a best selling work by one of my favorite authors, one I’ve read several times and will probably read again. I discovered that of its 962 pages, I could easily cut 350 without changing the story one whit. How? I would remove repeated material and unnecessary adjectives and change passive voice to active—and that’s about it. According to the “rules,” the author had done a lot “wrong.” Still, I’ve read that book over and over and have enjoyed the story every single time—as have many others. In part, I enjoyed it because of the author’s own perspective and voice, its strengths and its “weaknesses.” This process reinforced something for me: some people will like my work, some will not.

So, can you edit your own work? Yes. Use the materials available and make it the best you can—but stay true to yourself. Tell your story, not someone else’s story. Use your voice, not someone else’s. Follow your instincts—and then be prepared: some will like it, some will not.

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What is your experience with editing? Do you do your own, hire an editor, or both? Have you got any editing/editor advice you can offer independent authors?