Tag Archives: Picture This

A Drift of Quills: Picture This (#4)

It’s time to “Picture This!” Every first Friday of the month, A Drift of Quills gets together to chat about reading and/or writing. Writers often collect images to help them envision people, places, and things as they write. For this feature we’re sharing pictures and snippets about one of our works, giving you a sneak peek into our worlds!

A Drift of Quills: Writerly thoughts by writerly folks

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in this post are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

 

It’s time to “Picture This!” Every first Friday of the month, A Drift of Quills gets together to chat about reading and/or writing. Writers often collect images to help them envision people, places, and things as they write. For this feature we’re sharing pictures and snippets about one of our works, giving you a sneak peek into our worlds!
Elran = Model Gustav Morstad, Adam Katz Sinding, via le21eme.com

I have a huuuuge collection of images and will never run out of inspiration from that quarter! I write primarily fantasy, but that doesn’t stop me from seeing a science fiction style image and diving off the cliff of “What If…” That happened recently with the short story “Sixes” that I wrote for the Quills’ flash fiction challenge.

See if you can picture this: In my story, Elran’s Journey, the main character is the younger son of highly regarded and respected members of the Peerage. In the eyes of society, he has everything any boy could or should want.

 

Continue reading A Drift of Quills: Picture This (#4)

A Drift of Quills: Picture This (#3)

A Drift of Quills: Picture This (#3)

A Drift of Quills is bringing you their worlds—in brilliant technicolor! “Picture This” this is a recurring subject with the Quills. Why? Because it’s so darned fun! We love sharing our worlds with you, giving you a peek behind the scenes. Take a look at some of our favorites…
A Drift of Quills: Writerly thoughts by writerly folks

Disclosure of Material Connection: Some of the links in this post are “affiliate links.” This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive an affiliate commission. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255: “Guides Concerning the Use of Endorsements and Testimonials in Advertising.”

 

A Drift of Quills: Picture This #3—We love sharing our worlds with you, giving you a peek behind the scenes. Take a look at some of our favorites…

Making up worlds is one of the best things about writing in the fantasy genre. It’s also hard work! There’s a lot of space for the fantasy author to let their imagination run wild, but we also need to tether our settings to a reality the average reader can relate to.

My short story, The High Roads, opens in the woods as night approaches…

Foggy Redwoods—the setting for "The High Roads" short story
(mage of Foggy Redwoods courtesy of mrwallpaper.com)

Shifting shadows beneath the giant greenwood trees gave the forest an eerie appearance. Dense strands of mist from the sea intensified a sense of the ethereal. Telic Ruan waited against a tree trunk, gazing up at the branches that hung some hundred feet above his head. He refused to let the capricious ghosts of the coming night intimidate him.

That picture, that description, sets up the entire story. Well, duh, right? That’s what it’s supposed to do!

Right, but the trees and the fog are symbolic! So are the ghosts. Those four sentences lay out Telic’s problem—and his problem with the problem.

He thinks his problem is the Luzzil Ones, a race of inferior but sentient creatures who live in caves.

Luzzil Caves—setting in "The High Roads" by Robin Lythgoe
(image via Stopford_lad on 28dayslater.com)

“Not slaves — useful and productive members of society. Can’t you see that’s the best thing for them? They can’t organize themselves in any practical way. They can’t even take care of their own! You’ve been to their villages — if you can call them that. They don’t even know how to build! They live in caves full of filth and disease. All we want to do is help them lead productive, healthy lives.”

He doesn’t understand the real problem…

Have you read The High Roads? How do you picture the setting? The characters? Send me your pictures!!

(If you haven’t read the story, you can get a copy for the price of joining my email list. The link is in the sidebar! It’s also available on Amazon.)

PATRICIA REDING

Patricia RedingAuthor of Oathtaker and Select
Patricia’s website

The Oathtaker Series is set in a medieval sort of time. Of course, as it is a fantasy, it does not correlate to any actual historical age in our world. Thus, as the author, I had the pleasure of making it exactly what I wanted to be. With a fantasy, the author chooses all of the details of that world in which the tale is set. So, that world is what the author says it is—nothing more, and nothing less. There are no rights or wrongs when it comes to what technology might be available, how people dress, what they eat—or even the language they use or the way they speak. (Few of us could read the languages actually spoken in our world during the medieval period anyway, so why pretend to write in a manner exactly representative of those days?) Consequently, “medieval” is not an altogether apt description of Oosa, the land of the Oathtakers and Select.

I’ve decided to share pictures of a couple of buildings from my tales…  (See what Patricia is sharing!)

P.S. BROADDUS

“P.S.Author of A Hero’s Curse (The Unseen Chronicles Book 1)
Parker’s website

Long have images stirred my imagination. I recall flipping through dusty old classics looking for illustrations. I would sit and stare at The Chronicles of Narnia, or histories on Greek myth, entranced by the sketches within.
But images do more than keep me flipping through my tattered copy of Treasure Island–pictures are what start the whole story for me. C.S. Lewis talked about the same. When discussing how he came to write the books of Narnia, he wrote that they “all began with a picture of a Faun carrying an umbrella and parcels in a snowy wood.” My own storytelling is similar. I write from images in my head. For me, it was the picture of a young blind girl standing in the desert, listening to a long-awaited storm rolling in… (What will this lead to?)

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Many authors have “setting boards” on Pinterest. Do you follow any? Which are your favorites?

Let us know in the comments below!

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Today A Drift of Quills goes on a short visual expedition, sharing pictures of the people, places, and things from our latest works.

A Drift of Quills: Picture This (#2)

Wow. This is the last first Friday of the month for this year! (Did I bend your brain with that?) Today A Drift of Quills will take you on a short visual expedition. We want to share with you pictures of the people, places, and things from our latest works.

A Drift of Quills: Writerly thoughts by writerly folks

Levin Liam (in the movie "Wolfskinder")
Levin Liam (in the movie “Wolfskinder”)

For my person I’ve gone with the obvious choice: the main character. Sherakai’s tale begins when he is a youth, about fifteen years old. As the youngest of four boys, he’s got a pretty easy life. His father and his older brothers are warriors, and although he admires that, he has no inclination to follow in their footsteps. He’s not keen, either, on being sent away from horse and home to study at the faraway College of Magic. Of course nothing goes the way either Sherakai or his parents plan…

Photo by Alvarictus, via Flickr
Photo by Alvarictus, via Flickr

Sherakai’s beautiful home is located in rolling hills at the edge of the mountains. His father raises the Indimi-o per’la Tojitu there. The Children of the Wind are horses endowed with just a little bit of magic.

When Sherakai arrives at Nemura-o pera Sinohe—The Gates of Heaven—his life takes a turn down a dark path. His guardians, Fesh and Teth, look something like this:

Concept art from DMC: Devil May Cry
Concept art from DMC: Devil May Cry

 

Teeth clenched, Sherakai pushed the threads away, but it hurt as though he were tearing out parts of himself. The creatures howled, and Bairith’s voice rose above them, his spell-weaving become a command. Desperately, Sherakai reversed his actions and tried to pull the threads back into himself. He had more success at that, but the creatures came to their feet, writhing as they tried to escape the hands on their heads. Their howls increased to very human screams. The guards crouched next to them, wrapping arms around the distorted bodies to hold them immobile. A third guard moved behind Sherakai, clamping a hand around his throat and applying steady pressure.

Today A Drift of Quills goes on a short visual expedition, sharing pictures of the people, places, and things from our latest works.As consciousness began to fade, the tugging renewed and the dog beasts quieted. Darkness edged his vision, but it could not blanket the helpless sense of violation.

“There,” the mage said at last. He released Sherakai’s hands and gently stroked the animals’ misshapen heads. “There, it is done. All is well. Hush, hush …”

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TrishReding2PATRICIA REDING

Author of Oathtaker and Select
Patricia’s website

As we are approaching this holiday season, with all the “busy-ness” that it entails, it seemed right to keep things a bit simple this time around. Thus, we’ve decided to share with you, pictures of our imagined people, places and things from our work.

For a picture of a person, I’m actually going to expand this definition to include a character that is not a person. That is “Bane,” from Select: The Oathtaker Series, Book Two. Bane is a wolf that Jerrett mistakenly takes for a dog. Because of his connection to the animal via his attendant magic, Bane assists Jerrett in an escape . . .

… (Read more!)

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This is how we see our stories, and we hope these pictures pique your interest in the tales!

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Picture This!

Welcome to the Friday Feature of the Fantasy writers group, A Drift of Quills! We Quills get together once a month to chat up aspects of reading and writing. This month we’re choosing a picture we think best represents some person, place or thing in one of our works. I don’t know about you, but I love seeing the pictures that have inspired my fellow authors in their writing. Sometimes their choices are surprising, and at others I nod my head madly and say yes, yes! So—wanna see what we’re envisioning? Read on!

The character Crow, from my novel As the Crow Flies, is the obvious choice for this endeavor, so I’m going with him. When I wrote the book, I didn’t have a picture sitting by my computer to prompt or inspire me, but I had a very strong sense of him. In fact, I didn’t have a picture to represent Crow until after I started a Pinterest board for the novel. Crazy, right?
 
I found one fine-looking fellow, then another, then… my daughter came to me one day and said, “MOM! I know the perfect guy to play Crow! Colin O’Donoghue!” 
 
It turns out she was right:
(image courtesy of FanPop.com
from the television show “Once Upon a Time”)

“An alley appeared below me, but it was not so wide that I couldn’t make the jump, and I took it with a quivering thrill in my heart. No wings, no strings, an unmeasured height—and the certain knowledge of the cobbled street below. That dizzying leap on the run was one of the few ways I could ever get close to flying.” (excerpt from “As the Crow Flies“)

Crow’s companion, Tanris, began life as an image in my head too. And oh, what a chore it was to search through gazillions of pictures of men to find just the right one! Alas, someone had to do it. Alan Van Sprang didn’t have any trouble at all filling out the requirements of “tough, weathered, capable.” And look, a shaven head, too!
(image source unknown, from the film “The Immortals”)

“That was the Tanris I had come to know and appreciate over the years of our association, a man like myself, quick-witted and not confined to the obvious. He had come up with the perfect answer to our utterly impossible question, and at that moment I cheerfully hated him.” (excerpt from “As the Crow Flies”)

And here we have the Kerdann Moors that our heroes had to cross in search of the dragon’s egg:
(“Eerie Irish Countryside” from imgur.com)

“We’d come down out of the mountains without any incident and traveled east across the Kerdann Moors for days and days, shrouded in constant fog and mist. I had begun to doubt these parts guarded any kind of civilization at all. Even Kem had disappeared completely. Our supplies were so reduced that Girl rode one of the pack horses, silent as a sack but wonderfully obedient, doing whatever Tanris required of her, wrapped in an air of quiet, hopeless misery.” (excerpt from “As the Crow Flies”)

 
Last, but not least, I want to leave you with a teaser for my current work in progress, which is laboring under the working title of “The Sharpness of the Knife.” This is the fortress, Heaven’s Gate, where our young protagonist, Sherakai, unwillingly spends some formative years:
 
(image of Brunella fortress courtesy of Bed & Breakfast Lunigiana)
 
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KRISTIE KIESSLING
Author of the short story, Sanguis Dei and a poetry collection, Light and Dark

I have always loved deep forests and mountains. It seems natural, then, that when I began to write stories I would set them in such green and mystical old places of the world. Some of the most inspiring images in my head are things I have seen in this world: the ancient woods of Wales, the deep canyons and caves in Pennsylvania and Arizona. There are wonders to behold in our very backyards that strike me as otherworldly. 


. . .  (Read more!)

 
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PATRICIA REDING
Author of Oathtaker
 

A reader recently asked me, if Oathtaker was a movie, who did I see playing the characters? For me, the real difficulty in this question is knowing that whatever celebrity names and faces I choose, someone will not like them. It is amazing what strong feelings we have about celebrities, either because of their past work, or possibly as a result of the bits and pieces we hear about their private lives . . . But I will give this a shot, nonetheless.

I thought I would start with my main character, Mara . . .  (Read more!)

 
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Do you like seeing the author’s idea of who fits as models for the characters in their stories?
 
If you could choose someone to represent the mage Ammeluanakar (Melly), who would it be?

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